CL-84

CL-84 VTOL
  • Specification
  • Video
  • Manual
  • Original Plane
  • Spare Parts
Materials: EPO
Wingspan: 950mm (37.41in)   
Length: 1050mm (41.34in) 
Height: 340mm (13.39in)   
Flying weight: 1.7kg
Motor: 2pcs*900KV brushless motor, 1pc*850KV brushless motor 
ESC: 2pcs*40A brushless ESC, 1pc*20A brushless ESC 
Propeller: 2pcs* 2 paddles 10*4.5, 1pc *2 paddle 7*3.5 
Servo: 4pcs* 9g Servo 
Patent rotation mechanism: 1set
Patent control panel: 1pc 
Vertical takeoff and landing   
 Flying time:5-8 minutes 
Payload:200g


 

CF-VTO-X, the CL-84 prototype first flew in hover on 7 May 1965, flown by Canadair Chief Pilot Bill Longhurst. On 12 September 1967, after 305 relatively uneventful flights, CF-VTO-X was at 3,000 ft (910 m) when a bearing in the propeller control system failed. Both pilot and observer successfully ejected but the prototype was lost. Canadair redesigned its replacement, the CL-84-1 incorporating over 150 engineering changes including the addition of dual controls, upgraded avionics, an airframe stretch (1.6 m, 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m) longer) and more powerful engines (boosted by 100 hp).

The first newly designed CL-84-1 (CX8401) flew on 19 February 1970 with Bill Longhurst again at the controls. He continued with the CL-84 program until his retirement from active flying in January 1971. Doug Atkins then assumed the role of chief test pilot.At about the same time, at the height of the Vietnam War, the US Navy expressed interest in the concept. Atkins was dispatched on a cross-country tour that took a CL-84-1 to Washington DC (landing on the White House lawn), Norfolk, VirginiaEdwards Air Force Base and eventually full-blown trials on the USS Guam. The CL-84-1 performed flawlessly, demonstrating versatility in a wide range of onboard roles, including troop deployment, radar surveillance and anti-submarine warfare. It could perform wing transition from zero airspeed and accelerate to 100 knots in 8 seconds.

The potency of the CL-84-1 as a gun platform was dramatically illustrated in a Canadair promotional film. Fitted with a General Electric SUU 11A/A pod with a 7.62 mm mini-gun, Adkins maintained a rock-steady position as he sprayed a ground target. The rotating six-barrel "Gatling" gun delivered 3,000 rounds per minute, ripping up the target.

Continuing Tripartite trials by Canadian, US (Navy/Marine) and RAF evaluation pilots at the US Navy's Patuxent River Experimental Test Center showed that the CL-84-1 was a suitable multi-mission aircraft. RAF Flight Lieutenant Ron Ledwidge became the first to make a descending transition from hovering to conventional flight and back to hovering while on instruments.

On 8 August 1973, the first CL-84-1 was lost when a catastrophic failure occurred in the left propeller gearbox in a maximum power climb. The US Navy and US Marine pilots aboard ejected safely. Canadair representatives were sure something was wrong – the entire propeller and supporting structure of the gearbox had broken away during the climb. It was rumoured that the pilots had attempted to set an unauthorized climb record to 10,000 ft (3,000 m) to take that distinction away from the F-4 Phantom that had held it. The second CL-84-1 (CX8402) was rushed stateside to complete the Phase 2 trials on board the USS Guadalcanal. In the face of gale storm conditions, the "84" performed magnificently in tasks such as ferrying troops and "blind-flight." Phase 3 and 4 trials proceeded immediately after, but, despite rave reviews from over 40 pilots, the CL-84-1 did not land any production contracts.

 

 

From Wikipedia